Thank You

Almost four weeks ago, Steph and I boarded a plane in San Jose, California, bound for Minnesota. A lot has transpired since then, but rather than going into all that yet, I think it’s even more important that I take a minute and thank the folks who are responsible for us getting on that plane on time. Note this isn’t an exhaustive list, and doesn’t include all the wonderful time we spent with dear friends and coworkers, reminiscing and saying goodbyes. These are just the people who really broke a sweat to make this move happen for us.

Torrey and Shirley came to our house on the last day of packing and cleaning to help in any way they could. Torrey helped me to pack the final few boxes of our stuff, including the precious “nursing glider,” and gave me some sorely-needed friendship. When all your stuff is in a big white box and you’ve been living out of a suitcase for several days, it’s refreshing to have a friend who knows the proper response to, “I haff tvelve metchsteek.” Shirley, having never been to our place before that day, was happily cleaning kitchen drawers and a disgusting ceiling fan within 10 minutes of stepping through the front door. That’s some solid character. Where can one find more excellent people like these? I don’t know what I did to even make their acquaintance, but it must’ve been done very well and entirely by mistake. I have never earned such things.

Thank you, Torrey and Shirley.

Jenny and Kristin flew all the way from Minnesota just to help us out, and were absolutely instrumental in every phase of the operation. They helped pack. They helped organize. They kept us sane. They took us out to dinner. They put us up in a hotel! (This is a big deal when all your stuff is in boxes and your life is in chaos.) When it came time to give the house its final scrub-down before inspection, they worked miracles, taking on all the back-breaking tasks I knew had to be done but hesitated to start doing. I wish I had before-and-after photos of the laundry room. What a job!

Thank you, Jenny and Kristin.

Bob and Val brought their beautiful little newborn over to our house during a heavy and pivotal time of “PODS unit tetris.” Val and Steph kept each other company while they took care of the little ones, swapping stories and having what seemed to be much-needed downtime for Steph. Val also put a big dent in our kitchen packing to-do list. Meanwhile, it turned out Bob is some kind of packing prodigy, able to shift and twist objects in his head, combining them in unexpected ways to put large things into small spaces with no wiggle room left over. I learned quickly that if Bob said, “Maybe we should turn this on its side and put it up there…” that was exactly what we should do. Only those who want their stuff packed inefficiently question Bob. I did not. The PODS unit barely fit all the things we needed it to fit, and without Bob’s efforts, our impromptu Everything! Must! Go! yard sale would have been a lot more heartbreaking.

Thank you, Bob and Val.

Jason P. came over several times to help pack, and did a lot of the heaviest lifting along with Bob. But he also spent a little time with me, speaking to my soul, telling me what Steph and I have meant to him and others he had recently spoken to, and admitting that he hoped to find a way to sabotage our move so that we wouldn’t be able to leave. To the best of my knowledge, the closest he came to such sabotage was replacing the real box content lists on some of our packed boxes with lists containing items like “Death Star” and “lasers.” It didn’t slow us down, but like Jason himself, it was grade-A material.

Thank you, Jason.

Brian D. caravanned behind me for a 90 minute drive to Tracy, California, the first half of which was during rush hour. He has a newborn baby at home and barely had an hour’s notice to do this, and he volunteered. All so I could ship my Hyundai Elantra to Minnesota on time. Take special note that Brian loves politics like I love Apple, and he did this on Super Tuesday in the evening when he could’ve been at home, comfortably enjoying CNN. That’s like me missing a Stevenote. Heavy.

Thank you, Brian.

Ted and Scott came over more than anyone else to help pack and shift things around. They were both instrumental in the early planning phases of our PODS unit’s internal layout. Ted even came a couple times late at night. But he did far more than that. I was having difficulty selling my Honda Element with only just over a week-long window in which to do so, and I couldn’t afford to ship it. Ted’s response? He has some folks he’d like to see in Denver and Minneapolis, so if I can pick up the bill for gas (less than half the cost of shipping), of course he’s willing to drive my Honda from Cupertino to Mineapolis for me. Oh, and he’ll take only two days to do it. Is that OK?

Thank you, Scott. And thank you, Ted, times 2000 miles.

Let it be known: these people are amazing, and I am very lucky to count them as friends.

3 Comments

  1. Posted March 17, 2008 at 10:32 pm | Permalink

    Woo! I second these thoughts. Many many many thanks to all of you!

  2. Ted Rattei
    Posted March 26, 2008 at 3:10 am | Permalink

    Oh my, it was so sad to see you leave, I wanted to sabotage your moving operations too. But, you picked the right time to move, as I had time to help you pack. I’m thankful for the times that I’ve been encouraged and strengthened after hanging out with you two. So, taking a little drive ended up not being that big of a deal in the grand scheme of things, 🙂

    I just found out that I know someone who lives here and appreciates Garrison Keillor’s show! Which of course reminded me of Summer 2006 when we had dinner and then watched the movie, and reminisced about things that are distinctly “Minnesotan”!

  3. Scott Lauritsen
    Posted March 26, 2008 at 9:36 am | Permalink

    Ha ha! I think I left before anyone else that day. It was all for the Pizza, just kidding 😉 I hope you all are getting settled. We will miss you greatly. I love people whom you can hang out with for two days, and consider them friends. You all are truly amazing people.